Individuals aged Kindergarten and up are strongly encouraged to wear a face covering while visiting any indoor business or space open to the public in compliance with CDC guidelines and recommendations, but there are some exceptions where masks are required (see Governor Carney’s COVID-19 emergency order).

The following provisions become effective May 21, 2021 at 8:00 a.m. E.D.T.

Unvaccinated individuals and children aged kindergarten and up not eligible for the vaccine should continue to wear face coverings.

  • A “face covering” means a cloth, paper, or disposable face covering that fully covers the nose and the mouth.
  • Businesses may impose mask requirements for customers and employees.
  • Individuals aged Kindergarten and up are strongly encouraged to wear a face covering while visiting any indoor business or space open to the public in compliance with CDC guidelines and recommendations,

 


 


 

Where are face coverings required?

  • Any child under the age of two (2) must not wear a face covering because of the risk of suffocation.
  • TRANSPORTATION: When they are an employee or rider on public transportation, or a school bus, paratransit vehicle, taxi, private car service, or ride-sharing vehicle;
  • HEALH CARE: When they are an employee, patient, resident, or visitor at any healthcare facility, including, but not limited to, hospitals, medical clinics and offices, special care facilities, medical laboratories, dentists, pharmacies, blood banks and blood drives, or facilities providing veterinary care and similar healthcare services for animals—unless directed otherwise by the healthcare provider;
  • LONG-TERM CARE: when they are an employee or visitor at a facility licensed under Chapter 11 of Title 16. Residents of such facilities should wear face coverings as recommended by the CDC. If a resident and the resident’s visitor are fully vaccinated, face coverings do not need to be worn if the visit occurs in a private area;
  • HOME CARE: when they are an employee of a home care agency licensed under Section 122(3) of Title 16;
  • STATE-OWNED BUILDINGS: when they are a visitor at any state owned or operated facility open to the public, unless otherwise specified herein;
  • CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES: when they are an employee, resident, inmate, or visitor at any correctional or detention facility or a homeless shelter; or
  • CHILD CARE AND SCHOOLS: while they are an employee, student, or visitor inside any child care home, center, or school, except for meals, naps, or when doing so would inhibit the child’s health. If outside at a child care home or center or at a school, face coverings shall be worn by students (Kindergarten and above) if social distancing cannot be maintained. Caregivers at child care homes and centers, and educators at schools, must supervise use of face coverings by children to avoid misuse and monitor compliance.

 


 

Where can I find CDC Guidance?

Click here to learn more about the CDC’s guidance for fully vaccinated individuals.

If any individual who is not an employee, contractor, or volunteer declines to wear a face covering due to a medical condition that inhibits such usage, neither the business nor its staff shall require the individual to produce medical documentation verifying the stated condition. The business or indoor space operator may need to work with that individual to seek a reasonable accommodation. If the business or indoor space operator is providing medication, medical supplies, food, or other essential product or service, it must, when possible, provide a reasonable accommodation to access services, such as curbside pick-up, delivery, or an appointment by phone or video. A requested accommodation that would endanger any third party or create any likelihood of further infection is per se unreasonable and therefore not required.

What about medical conditions?

    • Individuals who have a medical condition that makes it hard to breathe or a disability that prevents the individual from wearing a face covering can request a reasonable accommodation from the business, school, or individuals responsible for indoor/outdoor spaces open to the public to enable full and equal access to services, transportation, and facilities open to the public. A requested accommodation that would endanger any third party or create any likelihood of further infection is per se unreasonable and therefore not required. A reasonable accommodation does not include simply allowing a customer inside without a face covering. Reasonable accommodations could include curbside pickup, delivery, or pick up by appointment.

 


 

Resources

 


 


Get More COVID Data

For more data on Delaware COVID cases, testing and outcomes, including demographic breakdowns, go to My Healthy Community